Tag Archives: EEOC

REGISTRATION OPEN! 27th Annual Labor & Employment Law Seminar

I cannot believe another year has come and gone! We are quickly approaching our 27th Annual Labor & Employment Law Seminar. Join us Friday, May 19th from 8am-4pm at the JW Marriott Marquis Miami as we “Predict the Future” and discuss what awaits employers in 2017. Mark your calendars now because this year’s seminar is not to … Continue Reading

Halloween Costumes at Work Could be “Tricky”

At the risk of reinforcing the notion of lawyers and human resources professionals as being the “no fun” bunch, we offer some practical tips to avoiding the unsuspecting tricks employers may experience after treating employees to Halloween cheer.  First, while many will revel in the opportunity to wear a costume to work and to enjoy … Continue Reading

There is a New EEOC “Sheriff” in Town!

I recently attended a breakfast meeting with Michael Farrell, the new District Director for the Miami office of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The Miami District Office has jurisdiction over the State of Florida (excluding a few counties in Florida’s Panhandle), as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.  Federico Costales was … Continue Reading

Top Takeaways from our 26th Annual Labor & Employment Law Seminar

With over 400 attendees from more than 200 employers, our 26th Annual Labor & Employment Law Seminar was a huge success! Thank you for allowing us to keep you “on Track”. For the first time this year, following our morning sessions, attendees were able to choose from our “high-speed” track designed for experienced HR professionals or our “Hop … Continue Reading

FIRST MONDAY IN OCTOBER PROMISES IMPORTANT RULINGS IN EMPLOYEE CASES

Walter Matthau and Jill Clayburgh were gifted actors.  But the new term of the Supreme Court, which opens today, promises to generate some drama of its own as well. Somewhat lost amid the understandable attention received by the historic same-sex marriage and Obamacare rulings last year were several important Supreme Court employment law cases regarding employee compensation … Continue Reading

Who Needs Congress When We Have The EEOC?

Legislative efforts have failed repeatedly at the federal level to add “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the list of protected classifications under anti-discrimination laws. That has not deterred the EEOC in its quest to protect the LGBT community from employment discrimination. On the heels of the Supreme Court’s historic decision in Obergefell on June … Continue Reading

OMG! Your Policy Says What?

Title VII, through the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA), has expressly prohibited pregnancy discrimination since 1978. Thirteen years later, the Supreme Court, in Johnson Controls, told us that even well-intentioned, but facially discriminatory, gender and pregnancy based employment policies — like Johnson Control’s policy of prohibiting fertile women from working on a battery line because of … Continue Reading

Gender Identity/Transgender Discrimination: A New Federal Enforcement Priority

Title VII does not protect against sexual orientation discrimination (though many state and local laws do). The battle to amend this most prominent of employment laws to protect sexual orientation has been waged for years, unsuccessfully. Yet, seemingly overnight, issues of gender identity or transgender discrimination have leapfrogged to the forefront of the federal enforcement … Continue Reading

Mandatory Arbitration Agreement Designed to Avoid Court is Now The Source of an EEOC Lawsuit

Mandatory arbitration agreements can reduce litigation. However, for at least one large employer, the arbitration agreement itself has created litigation. Last week, the EEOC sued restaurant franchise operator, Doherty Enterprises, Inc. claiming that the company’s practice of requiring employees to sign a mandatory arbitration agreement violates Title VII. Doherty operates Applebee’s restaurants in New York, … Continue Reading

Religious Discrimination: The Balance Between Protecting Customer Relations and Making Employee Accommodations

A bank teller in Kentucky recently sued her employer claiming that she was fired from her job for telling every customer she met to “have a blessed day.” She was just being polite, right? Well, the bank alleges that several customers were offended by the teller’s comment. The teller also allegedly confronted a customer asking “Did … Continue Reading
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