Tag Archives: Employment Litigation

Our group is growing – Tampa here we come!

This is an exciting time for the Firm, our Labor & Employment Law Department and our clients. We are pleased to welcome two new members to our group and to expand our footprint in Tampa. Janet Goldberg McEnery and Andrew W. McLaughlin each brings a wealth of knowledge and experience and a unique perspective to … Continue Reading

Did A Florida Appellate Court Just “Dis” An Employment Agreement’s Arbitration Provision?

Is it prudent for employers to require employees to sign mandatory arbitration agreements? There is no right or wrong answer to that question . . . just a long list of pros and cons.  Proponents of mandatory arbitration often focus on factors such as confidentiality, the ability to remove the risk of a “runaway jury,” … Continue Reading

Ambushed by Public Records Act Trolls: The Risk of Exposure for Private Companies

It’s Friday, nearly 5 o’clock and you’re getting ready to go home. A stranger appears at your office waiving a copy of the Florida Public Records Act, demanding to see your company’s records. You explain that “this is a private company and not subject to the Public Records Act”. You send him away. The following … Continue Reading

Class Action Waivers: Will The Supreme Court Successfully Realign The Litigation Galaxy?

Finally. The wait is almost over. The U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether an employer may enforce a mandatory arbitration agreement that contains a class action or collective action waiver. Last Friday, the Supreme Court agreed to hear 3 cases stemming from the NLRB’s 2012 decision in D.R. Horton, in which the NLRB held that … Continue Reading

What’s in YOUR COBRA Notice? Insufficiencies Could Drain Your Wallet

SunTrust Banks learned an expensive lesson about COBRA compliance recently. It was sued for failure to send proper COBRA election notices after employees terminated employment. SunTrust’s agent for COBRA notice purposes, Xerox HR Solutions, actually sent timely COBRA notices to the former employees.  But two former employees/plaintiffs claimed that the notices were legally insufficient and, … Continue Reading

Federal Court Gets Cat Scratch Fever

The “Cat’s Paw” doctrine describes the situation where an employer may be liable for employment decisions based on the discriminatory animus of an employee who influenced — but who did not make — an employment decision.  The phrase comes from an Aesop fable where a conniving monkey convinces a naïve cat to reach into a … Continue Reading

The Writ (and Wisdom) of Wage Garnishments

Your employee, Debbie Deadbeat, doesn’t pay her debts and gets slapped with a judgment. Before you know it, a process server comes to your office and serves you with a continuing writ of garnishment of Debbie’s salary and wages. First:  What is a Writ?  Second:  What should you do about it? A Writ is essentially … Continue Reading

Sacked by a Cell Phone: Tom Brady and the Peril of Destroying Evidence

Why is the Tom Brady saga referred to as “Deflategate”?  As many know, the penchant for adding the suffix “gate” to any scandal stems from the infamous 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters at the Watergate office complex and the Nixon Administration’s efforts to cover up its involvement.  Ultimately, President Nixon’s attempt to … Continue Reading
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