Tag Archives: INTERNAL INVESTIGATIONS

Employers Need To Deny This Employee Request: “Please Don’t Tell Anyone, But My Supervisor . . .”

Ver la versión en español aquí HR folks – Have you ever had an employee tell you that he or she is being unlawfully harassed by a co-worker, but then begged you to keep the complaint confidential? Most often, employees ask their employers not to investigate their concerns because of embarrassment or fear of retribution.  … Continue Reading

Does Sexual Harassment Training Work?

Ver la versión en español aquí The New York Times ran an article on December 11, 2017, titled, “Sexual Harassment Training Doesn’t Work. But Some Things Do.” The article describes sexual harassment training as an exercise that consists of “clicking through a PowerPoint, checking a box that you read the employee handbook or attending a … Continue Reading

Headline News! HR Tips to Curb Harassment and Discrimination

Ver la versión en español aquí While several well-known corporate executives, movie stars, government officials and other high profile people have been facing sexual harassment claims in recent weeks (and the list seems to increase daily), the issue is most assuredly not limited to those in the public eye.  All employers are wise to use … Continue Reading

What’s the Effect of the Sessions’ Memo on Transgender Discrimination?

Ver la versión en español aquí On October 4, 2017, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a memorandum advising that the U.S. Department of Justice will no longer take the position that Title VII (the law which prohibits discrimination based on sex, race, color, national origin, and religion) prohibits discrimination based on “gender identity per … Continue Reading

The EEOC Rings Out 2016 with End of the Year Stats

Ver la versión en español aquí We all love factoids-right? So if you are heading out to a New Year’s Eve Party this weekend and need a few icebreakers to get the conversation going, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) has come to the rescue. The EEOC recently provided a brief review of its fiscal year … Continue Reading

Non-Compete Agreements Under Fire by the White House?

Ver la versión en español aquí Not really. On October 25, 2016, the White House issued a call to action urging states to reform their non-compete laws.  The call to action acknowledges that non-compete agreements are appropriate in certain circumstances, (for example, to protect trade secrets), but expressed the view that employers are, in many instances, … Continue Reading

Federal Court Gets Cat Scratch Fever

Ver la versión en español aquí  The “Cat’s Paw” doctrine describes the situation where an employer may be liable for employment decisions based on the discriminatory animus of an employee who influenced — but who did not make — an employment decision.  The phrase comes from an Aesop fable where a conniving monkey convinces a … Continue Reading

There is a New EEOC “Sheriff” in Town!

Ver la versión en español aquí I recently attended a breakfast meeting with Michael Farrell, the new District Director for the Miami office of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The Miami District Office has jurisdiction over the State of Florida (excluding a few counties in Florida’s Panhandle), as well as Puerto Rico and the … Continue Reading

Miranda Rights in the Workplace? Not Quite, but Meet His Cousin Weingarten

Ver la versión en español aquí Picture this.  You suspect an employee (Slick Fingers) has been stealing in the workplace for weeks.  Today, multiple witnesses approach you and say they have witnessed Slick taking money from the cash register.  You feel inspired by the four episodes of the “First 48” you watched the night before … Continue Reading

Back by Popular Demand: “New Mental Disorders Could Lead to Spike in ADA Claims”

Ver la versión en español aquí What do forgetfulness, menstrual cramps and temper tantrums have in common? They are all symptoms of new mental health disorders recognized in the latest version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), a handbook widely used by health care professionals to assess and diagnose mental disorders. … Continue Reading

Mandatory Arbitration Agreement Designed to Avoid Court is Now the Source of an EEOC Lawsuit

Ver la versión en español aquí Mandatory arbitration agreements can reduce litigation. However, for at least one large employer, the arbitration agreement itself has created litigation. Last week, the EEOC sued restaurant franchise operator, Doherty Enterprises, Inc. claiming that the company’s practice of requiring employees to sign a mandatory arbitration agreement violates Title VII. Doherty … Continue Reading

Hey, NBA Commissioner Silver, Way to Flex Your HR Muscle

Kudos to NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, who, like a true HR professional, fined Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling $2.5 million and banned Sterling for life from the NBA. The punishment came last week on the heels of a leaked audio recording in which Sterling is heard scolding V. Stiviano, Sterling’s “personal assistant” (code name … Continue Reading

Manna From Heaven? – NLRB Has Provided Confidentiality Language That Complies With the Law

Employers, union and non-union alike, have been spinning their wheels every time the NLRB comes out with a new case, general counsel memorandum or advice memorandum slamming a generally accepted employment policy.  This past year, we have seen the NLRB take on social media policies, collective action waivers, at-will disclaimers and confidentiality rules.  This time, … Continue Reading

Employers Beware: NLRB Says Your Confidentiality Rules and At-Will Employment Disclaimers May Violate the Law

This summer, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) highlighted its position that confidentiality rules and at-will employment disclaimers routinely promulgated by employers may violate the federal labor law.  The NLRB held that a generalized directive to employees not to discuss matters under investigation with co-workers interfered with the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”).  The NLRB … Continue Reading

The Fifth Circuit Says Employer Can Privately Settle FLSA Claims Without DOL or Court Approval

For over 30 years, the federal courts in Florida (and in other states) have required that settlements of minimum wage and overtime claims under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) be reviewed and approved either by a court or the US Department of Labor.   Now, one court, the Fifth Circuit Court Of Appeals, the federal … Continue Reading

Wishing You a Holiday Season Filled With Joy and Peace (And No Lawsuits)!

Christmas music was playing in the mall this past weekend…it’s official, the Holidays are here!  The Holidays are a great opportunity for your employees to celebrate and unwind after a long year.  The season can also bring employment issues including but not limited to claims of religious discrimination, sexual harassment and liability for your company. … Continue Reading

Violence or the Threat of Violence in the Workplace, Whether by an Employee or Outsider, May Trigger an OSHA Inspection

On September 8, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Directive with general enforcement policies and procedures for field offices when conducting inspections relating to workplace violence.  The Directive focuses not only on the steps to be taken in response to an incident of workplace violence but the factors OSHA will consider when … Continue Reading

Polygraphing Employees – A Recent Eleventh Circuit Case Serves as a Refresher

The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals recently issued a decision addressing an employer’s requirements under the Employee Polygraph Protection Act of 1988 (EPPA).  The decision, Cummings v. Washington Mutual, is the first in recent memory from a court with jurisdiction over Florida. Before discussing the case, we provide a quick refresher on EPPA.  Generally, the … Continue Reading

Court Says Woman Who Quit Her Job is Entitled to Unemployment Benefits

A Florida appellate court, in Rivera v. Fla. Unemployment Appeals Commission and Pollo Operations, Inc., has directed Florida’s unemployment agency to give unemployment benefits to a woman who voluntarily quit her job.  The woman, Nail Rivera, worked at Pollo Tropical restaurant for nine years when she complained that an assistant manager touched her buttocks.  Ms. Rivera … Continue Reading
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